Reviews

Matthew Nash is drawn to issues of style, whether in writing, theater or fashion. He has an eye for line and sleek visual effect. And his wit can be wickedly telling. But Mr. Nash’s Allure goes beyond all that in a feat of theatrical juggling that has resulted in a piece that is surprisingly touching.
Jennifer Dunning The New York Times

Matthew Nash is definitely a maverick. In an age of hype and rough sex, he makes quiet pieces tinged with nostalgia and romance, miniatures as charming as an old-fashioned valentine. He is that rarity: a downtown soul who loves ballet, which he uses as an unlikely ingredient of his mixed-media performance art. Along with his talent as a miniaturist, Nash’s latest concert revealed his growing mastery of pure dance choreography. Almanac gobbles up space in a new, thrilling way, from the charging runs and rolls to the clear, expansive designs that make you long for a bigger stage.
Lynn Garafola Dance Magazine

Nash possesses a witty, chameleon-like stylistic fluency and a wide range of reference. . . Nash’s ideas are usually so clever, and his methodology so clear, that we “get” his jokes right away.

Robert Sandla The Village Voice

His work is definitely the product of an original mind.
David Vaughan Dance Magazine

And now for something entirely different. . .
Jacqueline Maskey Musical America

Matthew Nash has his own brand of humor in dance. . .quirky, individual. . . always an intellect and intelligence at work, a choreographer who possesses the polish and urbanity of a David Niven.
Lillie F. Rosen Attitude

In Nash’s skillful hands, the dry text becomes the springboard for some lush dances.
Georgette Gouveia Gannett Newspapers

In The Winter of Cities is a beautiful haunting piece that has the delicious intimacy of two voices whispering in the dark.
Georgette Gouveia Gannett Newspapers

Mr. Nash gets under the surface and suggests the possible beauty of “diamonds in a northern light.”
Jennifer Dunning The New York Times

Nash was as distinctive a performer as he is a choreographer.
Georgette Gouveia Gannett Newspapers

Nash plays off the weight and articulate torso of modern dance against the lift, precision, and steps of ballet. These he uses with real imagination. In the third movement of Almanac, there is an overhead “Soviet” lift, slipped in so unobtrusively that it seems reborn without bombast––a quiet moment of intimacy. And in the pirouettes of his solo for Sylvia Nolan, he reveals the calm center that gives her dancing its gravity and inner stillness.
Lynn Garafola Dance Magazine

Matthew Nash is a rare creature in the ballet world, a choreographer with a passion for language. . . In Nash’s work, the fine dancers exhibit abrupt phrasing and crispness of line. The choreographies are not quite of this time and place; they’re intelligent glosses on several periods and attitudes from the ballet canon.
Elizabeth Zimmer Dance Magazine

The American dancer Matthew Nash performs his measures as the “man of joy” with a bodily eloquence that perfectly matches the original musical score.
Ossia Trilling The Financial Times, London

Almanac gobbles up space in a new, thrilling way, from the charging runs and rolls to the clear, expansive designs that make you long for a bigger stage.
Lynn Garafola Dance Magazine

Minimal movement –– some embraces, all tender, caring, stretchy, classical yet dissonant, making an unspoken plea for universal acceptance of human beings, done in exquisitely fine taste.
Lillie F. Rosen Attitude

Nash’s signature work, The Elements of Style. A dance about the principles of good writing, it brings punctuation, phrasing, and lively language to life in a witty and glamorous fashion.
Elizabeth Zimmer Dance Magazine

Another work of wit and excellence, fun to watch and probably more fun to do.
Lillie F. Rosen Jewish Journal

For his successful new work, a suite of dance and song to four Tennessee Williams poems, Nash has followed the master’s own lead. As Williams invokes “something unspoken in the room,” so Nash has had the foresight––and courage–– to trust his ingeniousness and intuition, to suggest much without defining too much.
Barry Laine The Advocate

The piece was –– well, stylish, and it had something of the wit and terseness of its model.
David Vaughan Dance Magazine

Strong praise must also be granted Nash as composer. His previous dance-music compositions have been genial and intriguing; these particularly memorable and delicate art songs offer a rare balance of melody and poetry.
Barry Laine The Advocate

In some ways, Nash’s ballets resembled the creative outbursts of the Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in the 1920s. One Nash work, Allure, choreography and music by Nash, words from Diana Vreeland’s book of the same name, caught dance fans’ eyes and became, in the course of one weekend, a smash hit talked about all over New York.
Ken Sandler Gannett Today